Even With The Eviction Moratorium, Landlords Continued To Find Ways To Kick Renters Out

This article is part of TPM Cafe, TPM’s home for opinion and news analysis. It first appeared at The Conversation.

Millions of renters in the U.S. lost a key protection keeping them in their homes on Aug. 26, 2021, with a Supreme Court ruling ending a national moratorium on eviction.

The federal stay on evictions was put in place during the coronavirus pandemic to protect renters falling behind on monthly payments and therefore in danger of needing to stay at homeless shelters or with friends or relatives. This pandemic response was designed to keep tenants in their housing, prevent overcrowding in shelters and homes, and reduce the spread of COVID-19.

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In early August, 7.9 million renter households reported being in arrears, with 3.5 million saying they

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American Institute of Architects in Wis. give top honors to 4 projects

The new homes for the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and the Milwaukee Ballet were among the projects that received the highest honor award from Wisconsin’s society of architects. 

The American Institute of Architects in Wisconsin awarded four projects designed by members the group’s highest honor in its annual design awards program. 

The Bradley Symphony Center of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, which was designed by Milwaukee firm Kahler Slater, opened earlier this year. 

The new home for MSO musicians reimagined the former Warner Grant Theatre at 212 W. Wisconsin Ave. The project involved moving a massive wall, preserving the theater’s wall and ceiling adornments and upgrading the kitchen.

The nomination for the Bradley Symphony Center commented on the restoration of the empty vaudeville movie palace into a live music venue. 

“The design concept celebrated and restored the building to its former glory, while strategically placed additions expand the guest experience and provide

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NW Indiana home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright sells for $1M

A home designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright that’s one of only two surviving Wright-designed residences in northwest Indiana has sold for more than $1 million.

Oak Park, Illinois, resident Brian Bobek bought the Armstrong House for $1.02 million in April, The (Northwest Indiana) Times reported, citing Porter County property records.

The dramatic, light-filled home was built in 1939 in Ogden Dunes, a Lake Michigan lakefront town about 40 miles (64 kilometers) east of Chicago. It’s sometimes also called the Armstrong Dune House because of its location on a sloping sand dune.

The two-story, 3,696-square-foot (343.4-square-meter) brick home overlooks landscaped, wooded lots. It boasts four bedrooms, four bathrooms, a retro carport, two fireplaces, a sauna, and many other features, including a screened-in porch that showcases the surrounding woods.

The house was built for the family of Andrew Armstrong, an advertising director in Chicago, and was the

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