Luxury home designs go high-tech

Luxury home design is trending “smart.”

Big-screen televisions roll up vertically and hide in a piece of furniture. Intelligent toilets greet visitors with classical music, while automatically opening the lid. Smart ovens can be controlled from anywhere in the world.

All these examples illustrate some of the latest smart home automation innovations available for ultra-efficient, comfortable luxury living environments while reducing energy costs.

“Technology is proliferating into every aspect of our lives and all products,” Sun West Custom Homes owner Dan Coletti said. “It’s starting to go into the simplest things.”

A luxury builder in Vegas for more than 30 years, Coletti has seen technology evolve and change significantly as it advances into every room of the home.

The pandemic further advanced the need, and desire, for technology to augment remote learning, working and healthier living environments. Circadian lighting systems and powerful air purification units circulating and scrubbing the air

Read More

12 sexy home bar designs

‘In 2021, the home bar has come out of the closet!’’ Heather Vaughan of Heather Vaughan Design (www.heathervaughandesign.com) proclaims. Instead of tucking bars behind closed doors, clients want them out in the open, often with boutique hotel-type vibes.

Designers are installing speakeasies and sports bars in basements, morphing unused sunrooms into grownup getaways, and outfitting empty rooms over the garage with high-top tables and ice makers. Andra Birkerts of Andra Birkerts Design (www.andrabdesign.com) refers to such spaces as “lures’’ because they pull people into more remote parts of the house. “It gives people a cool place to go and provides a location for alternative interactions, like sitting at the bar,’’ she said.

Home bars aren’t always out-of-the-way. Nikki Dalrymple of Acquire (www.acquireboutique.com) is re-imagining formal living rooms in suburban homes as cocktail lounges. Since these rooms are usually adjacent to the dining room, the

Read More

Home Designs Changes in 2022 – What Is Out of Style

Home design trends come and go. Styles that are all the rage eventually get overused and become outdated. We all know that sensation of style fatigue — you feel like you’ve seen the same thing over and over, and just want something new and fresh.

As we head into 2022, there are several trends that we’ll be saying goodbye to. In some cases, these trends have been slowly fading away for years because they’re impractical or difficult to maintain, while in other instances, the COVID-19 pandemic caused homeowners to embrace other options.

These are the interior design trends you should pack up and store away… at least until the cycle finds its way back around again.

modern and open kitchen with large glass windows

Kitchen trends that won’t be trendy in 2022

Avoid these design trends if you want to keep your kitchen from looking stuck in the past.

Faux finishes

Homeowners are looking for materials that

Read More

Grand Designs viewers stunned by urban home the size of a London tube carriage

GRAND Designs viewers could not believe their eyes when they saw a house so tiny it was the size of a London tube carriage.

The Channel 4 series presented its annual, House of the Year special, and featured the tiny home in south London.

Grand Designs viewers were in awe of a tiny house built in London.  The 'Slot House' is 2.8 metres wide and the size of a London Tube carriage

8

Grand Designs viewers were in awe of a tiny house built in London. The ‘Slot House’ is 2.8 metres wide and the size of a London Tube carriage
The Slot House was designed by architects, and married couple, Sally and Sandy Rendel

8

The Slot House was designed by architects, and married couple, Sally and Sandy Rendel
Some of the home's features include exposed materials which allowed more space as nothing was plaster boarded.

8

Some of the home’s features include exposed materials which allowed more space as nothing was plaster boarded.

The ‘Slot House’ was designed by married architecture couple Sally and Sandy Rendel.

They built the house in a 2.8 metre gap alongside their home and come up with a series of innovative ideas to make the most out of the small space.

Sandy

Read More